BSD Medical is Now Pyrexar Medical

The complete line of BSD Hyperthermia products are availble thru Pyrexar Medical

Meet Sam Cervantes.  Sam is a radiation therapist RT(t) at the Tacoma Valley Radiation Oncology Center in Western Washington.  The TVROC is regional network of treatment centers made up of five locations around the Puget Sound.  Jackson Hall Medical Center in Tacoma, WA;  St. Joseph Medical Pavilion, also in Tacoma; Dr. Richard C. Ostenson Cancer Center in Puyallup; Jane Thompson Russell Cancer Care Center in Gig Harbor and Capital Medical Center in Olympia.

Sam runs the Hyperthermia equipment in the oncology department. Originally from Florida, she has been living in Washington State for the past three years. She tells us they typically use the PYREXAR BSD-500 Superficial Hyperthermia System to treat Recurrent Chest Wall tumors (breast cancer) and Head & Neck tumors in conjunction with radiotherapy.  Typically, each radiation session is accompanied by a 45-minute treatment of hyperthermia.  “We bring the treatment area up to our target temperature of 42˚F and hold that temperature.  The results are great”.

One system is transported to each of the five treatment centers to share. This makes the system very affordable and increases access to superior care. During our visit we found everyone in the TVROC to be high quality, dedicated professionals who care deeply about their patients health.  And did I mention, great results!  To learn more about the clinical studies on treating RCW breast cancer and Head & Neck cancers using hypethermia, click the links.

Cancer is the leading cause of death in urban China, according to the World Health Organizations GLOBALCAN study. Lung, stomach, liver, esophageal and colorectal cancers make up the second largest cause of death in the country overall. With a population approaching 1.4 billion, you can see how important it is to find successful therapies to treat this disease.

To address cancer treatment in China, our CTO and chief Scientist, Paul Turner, was invited to speak at a conference held at the Dailan #2 Hospital in the Liaoning province of China. Paul, along with our CEO Mark Falkowski, made the trip last week to participate in the discussion.

The event attracted clinicians and researchers interested in understanding how hyperthermia can improve outcomes and save lives.

The presentations included:

  • Deep Hyperthermia with Phased Array Methods and Clinical Application; Paul Turner – Pyrexar Medical
  • Hyperthermia Combined with Taxol in Malignant Ascites Treatment; Dr. Yingying Huang - Beijing Hospital Oncology Department
  • Hyperthermia Combined with Chemotherapy in Gastrointestinal Tumors Treatment; Dr. Li Ding - Beijing Hospital Oncology Department
  • Green Therapy in Oncology-Application of BSD-2000 Annular Phased Array Methods; Qing Zhang - Beijing Chinese Medicine Hospital

As a wrap up to this successful event, our host Orientech invited our small U.S. delegation to a wonderful meal featuring regional favorites. Not only did we leave making many new friends, we also negotiated a purchase agreement for four BSD-2000 Deep Regional Hyperthermia systems with our new distribution partner Orientech.

orientech group

We hope our entrance into the Chinese market will help reduce the number of cancer fatalities.

Deep tissue hyperthermia uses heat with radiation therapy or chemotherapy to treat pelvic or abdominal region tumors.

For example, when used on some cervical cancer patients who aren’t able to receive chemotherapy, deep tissue hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy may be a promising treatment option.

Prior to this procedure, a CT scan is performed to locate the tumor. During the deep tissue hyperthermia treatment, temperature probes are placed both externally and internally to accurately monitor temperatures during the treatment.

A water-filled applicator bladder (called a bolus) is then placed over the patient’s torso and focused electromagnetic energy (radio frequency energy) is directed at the tumor, exposing the tumor to a temperature of above 104°F or 40°C. The heating effect is monitored and can be turned down if it becomes too hot. It immediately stops when the equipment is turned off.

Deep tissue hyperthermia dilates blood vessels around the tumor, causing oxygen-carrying red blood cells to spread into the tumor.

When the patient is later exposed to radiation treatment, the radiation reacts with the high levels of oxygen in the tumor, potentially destroying the tumor cells. Or if the patient receives chemotherapy after deep tissue hyperthermia, it can increase the flow of blood to the tumor area, potentially bringing more chemotherapy to the tumor.

The deep tissue hyperthermia treatment can take up to two hours and is typically performed twice a week for the duration of the radiation or chemotherapy treatment. When radiation is done prior to the hyperthermia that the hyperthermia inhibits DNA repair from the radiation damage to the tumor cells.

 

Typically, when treating cancerous tumors, a patient may receive radiation therapy or chemotherapy. While these treatments can be beneficial in some cases, an innovative technology called Hyperthermia, may be used in conjunction with these therapies to increase their effectiveness.

Hyperthermia is used to damage and kill cancer cells. It may also make cancer cells more sensitive to the effects of radiation and certain anticancer drugs, potentially reducing the number of radiation treatments needed. There are also minimal side-effects.

Prior to this procedure, a CT scan is performed to precisely locate the tumor area. During Hyperthermia treatment, the affected area is heated superficially by the use of an applicator. The applicator is placed over the patient and may sometimes be filled with water to conform to the patient’s surface anatomy. Microwaves are used to heat the area. The body tissue is exposed to high temperatures (up to approximately 109ºF or 43ºC).

As the heat travels into the body, it dilates blood vessels around the tumor, causing oxygen-carrying red blood cells to spread into the tumor. When the patient is later exposed to radiation treatment, the radiation reacts with the high levels of oxygen in the tumor, killing the tumor cells. This procedure can take up to 1 hour and is performed twice a week for the duration of radiation treatment.

It is recommended to consult your doctor so they can determine the cancer therapy most appropriate for you.