BSD Medical is Now Pyrexar Medical

The complete line of BSD Hyperthermia products are availble thru Pyrexar Medical

Celsion nanotechnology cancer drug

Early Evidence Shows Positive Data for Hyperthermia Drug

It may not be nano-robots yet, but hyperthermia triggered smart release drugs are definitely here to stay. Celsion, maker of the chemotherapy drug ThermoDox, announced data from its Phase 2 DIGNITY trial for recurrent chest wall (RCW) breast cancer.  The early results, available from their recent press release, show that every patient in the trial experienced a clinical benefit.

ThermoDox is one of several heat-activated nanoparticle liposomal encapsulated drugs arriving on the market. Like traditional chemotherapy, the encapsulated drug is delivered through the blood stream to all parts of the body.  The difference is that drug is only released when it reaches the tumor and nowhere else. It does this using a hyperthermic response mechanism. Patients receive localized hyperthermia treatments to heat the tumor to 42˚C (108˚F). The hyperthermia treatment begins to shrink and sensitizes the tumor to chemotherapy.  When the drug reaches the “thermal zone” (40˚C or greater), it opens up the encapsulation releasing the chemo on target.

Doing this not only makes sure that enough therapeutic drug gets delivered to the cancer, but also protects the rest of the body from the harmful side effects of traditional chemotherapy delivery.  The remainder of the unused drugs gets flushed through the body naturally.  I have linked the Celsion webpage that has a great video demonstrating the process.

At it’s annual scientific meeting in Zurich, Switzerland June 24-26, 2015, the European Society of Hyperthermic Oncology (ESHO) bestowed its highest honor, the 30th annual ESHO-Pyrexar Award, on Jan Vrba, PhD. Dr. Vrba is Professor and Chairman, Department of Electromagnetic Fields, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University (CTU), Prague. The ESHO-Pyrexar Award is awarded annually for outstanding contributions to hyperthermic oncology, education and scientific achievement. Prof. Vrba received his PhD in Communications Technology from the CTU in 1976. He rose through the academic ranks to become full professor and department chairman in 1993, the position he still holds. He has held many prestigious academic appointments at the CTU including membership on the Scientific Board 1994-97, serving as Vice-Rector from 1994-97 and as Chancellor from 2000-2002.

Prof. Vrba’s research efforts have concentrated on the interaction between electromagnetic fields and biological systems most notably the medical application of microwaves, specifically the design of microwave applicators for inducing hyperthermia for cancer treatment.Prof. Vrba has published well over 100 scientific papers.

An indication of the respect held by his scientific colleagues is that Prof. Vrba has been the Congress Chairman of a number of prominent international scientific meetings including: The Annual Meeting of ESHO in Prague in 2007; the Progress in Electromagnetic Research Symposium (PIERS) in Prague in 2007; the Microwave and Radioelectronics Week (MAREW) in Prague in 2008; the Int. Symp. on Microwave & Optical Technology (ISMOT) in Prague in 2011 and again the PIERS meeting in Prague to be held July 5-10, 2015. The PIERS meeting will attract over 2,000 attendees.

Note:  This year's ESHO-Pyrexar Award was sponsored by Dr. Gerhard Sennewald of Dr. Sennewald Medizintechnik GmbH

 

 

key CCTA what is ht

According to the American Cancer Society, pancreatic cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate of all major cancers. 94% of pancreatic cancer patients will die within five years of diagnosis – only 6% will survive more than five years.

As you may know, June 23rd is National Pancreatic Cancer Advocacy Day. In preparation, I contacted Dr. Curt Heese from the Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Philadelphia and asked to tell us his experience treating this disease.

Q: Can hyperthermia play a role in the treatment of pancreatic cancer?
A: Certainly pancreatic cancer can be very difficult to treat, and having hyperthermia as a way to potentially improve, while not significantly increasing side effects, is a great advantage for patients.

Q: I know you are using hyperthermia at CTCA, what has been your experience?
A: We’ve been seeing some wonderful responses to the therapy, but one case does stand out. A patient with locally advanced pancreatic cancer was receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy in preparation for surgery, and deep tissue hyperthermia was being given immediately prior to each chemotherapy session in the hopes of helping achieve a stronger response, thereby increasing resectability.

Q: So your goal is a course of chemotherapy to shrink the tumor before attempting to remove it surgically. And hyperthermia is added to help shrink the tumor and make the tumor more sensitive to the chemo. What was the result in this case?
A: At surgery, they found not just a reduction in tumor burden, but a complete pathologic response with no tumor left when the tissue was examined under microscope. Although we expect size reduction from chemotherapy, chemotherapy alone would not be expected to achieve a complete response. We were thrilled for the patient and it really cemented our belief that hyperthermia can enhance treatment in many types of cancer.

I want to thank Dr. Heese for his comments. I dug into the archives and found an older video clip of Dr. Heese explaining the hyperthermia treatment process. Worth a quick view.

Just published, a clinical review of  38 studies comparing clinical outcomes with and without hyperthermia. Spoiler Alert, chances of a complete response (no more cancer) is increased by and average of 35% when hyperthermia was added to the treatment protocol.  The studies compared included cancers of the breast, cervix, head/neck, rectum, bladder, oesophagus, lung, plus superficial tumors, and melanoma. The full abstract is printed below with links to the complete published report.

Abstract

Hyperthermia, one of the oldest forms of cancer treatment involves selective heating of tumor tissues to temperatures ranging between 39 and 45°C. Recent developments based on the thermoradiobiological rationale of hyperthermia indicate it to be a potent radio- and chemosensitizer. This has been further corroborated through positive clinical outcomes in various tumor sites using thermoradiotherapy or thermoradiochemotherapy approaches. Moreover, being devoid of any additional significant toxicity, hyperthermia has been safely used with low or moderate doses of reirradiation for retreatment of previously treated and recurrent tumors, resulting in significant tumor regression. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies also indicate a unique immunomodulating prospect of hyperthermia, especially when combined with radiotherapy. In addition, the technological advances over the last decade both in hardware and software have led to potent and even safer loco-regional hyperthermia treatment delivery, thermal treatment planning, thermal dose monitoring through noninvasive thermometry and online adaptive temperature modulation. The review summarizes the outcomes from various clinical studies (both randomized and nonrandomized) where hyperthermia is used as a thermal sensitizer of radiotherapy and-/or chemotherapy in various solid tumors and presents an overview of the progresses in loco-regional hyperthermia. These recent developments, supported by positive clinical outcomes should merit hyperthermia to be incorporated in the therapeutic armamentarium as a safe and an effective addendum to the existing oncological treatment modalities.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Icon for Elsevier Science